Lessons Learned From Building a $40 Million Growth Machine

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Early on, many entrepreneurs learn the important lesson of making the business less about them, and more about the mission.

For today’s guest, Jacky Fischer, CEO of 3 Men Movers, that was exactly the mindset shift that sparked tremendous growth for her company. During this episode, Jacky shares the lessons she learned on her journey to building a $40 million business.

We discuss:

- Putting the mission and vision of the company at the center

- Working towards true accountability

- How the manifesto informs her company’s culture

- Why the way to run your business is the opposite of what you think

Check out these resources we mentioned during the podcast:

- Jacky’s book is The Growth Paradox: The Way to Run a Business is Opposite of What You Think.

For more episodes like this one, find us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Path to Profit in your favorite podcast player.

At once, we had a set schedule and aset agenda and it went on with or without me I wasn't the most importantthing in the room. That's when we really started getting engagement andwe really started growing because the team led the meetings you were listening to paste profit, apodcast looking at business growth from every angle, postle. If you're lookingto hear stories of success and failure, lessons learned from leaders that havegrown and scaled their businesses you've come to the right place. Let'sget into the show, welcome back to path to profits. I'myour host for today's episode, Stephen King, CEO of Growth Force, I'm joinedtoday by our great friend, Jackie Fisher, CEO of three men movers. Howare you today it's great to be with you on the show? I am excited because Iknow this story even and I have been INVISTA together for over a decade, andI want you to share the lessons you'velearned on your path to from a three million dollar business to a fortymillion dollar business. That's the most profitable business in our vestagegroup. So before we begin tell you listeners alittle bit about who you are and about your background and what three menmovers is up to and how you got started at all this, so I originally startedthis when I was twelve years old and I was the first sales person, it wastruly a family business. My Dad was out on the trucks. He started the companywhen he was fifty years old and he had a junkie delivery truck after closingdown a furniture business and he had his back of bills to pay and my mom wasmaking minimum wage at the public library, and so he put an ad in thegreen sheet that was before online stuff and the Internet, and he startedmoving furniture at age fifty and he was going to do it for a few months topay the bills, and that was never thirty years ago now we have locationsall over taxes were opening locations in Florida and will probably dosomewhere around. I don't know thirty, eight sand jobs sit here, so we've runquite a bit since that time, thirty eight thousand jobs. So how did youmanage all that growth? Well, I think the changing point for me and the partthat really had a ripple effect in our business that created non linear growthwas when I realized the business. Wasn'tall about me and I had to explain that a little bit, because I don't think I'mI mean you know me well enough, Stephen, I'm not like an ego person, but when Iwhen I say that when I was first running the business I felt like I wasthe center of like a wheel where everything kind of rotated around meand I had to get out of being the center of the wheel and put the missionof the company in the vision of the company in the center and even fromsomething as simple as leadership meetings with my management team. WhenI took myself out of the center and...

...made it about the company, a visionwhere we're going, what we're trying to achieve that's when things started tochange when it was about me, the meeting started when I walked into theroom. If I was ten minutes late, people waited till. I walked into the room, itended if I had to leave early the Medina that ended early. If I was outon holiday, we didn't have meeting that week. It was all about me and once wehad a set schedule and a set agenda and it went on with or without me I wasn'tthe most important thing in the room. That's when we really started gettingengagement and we really started growing because the team led themeetings and they were more engaged in instead of me, showing up with myagenda and talking at them we're all having this really nice productive flowof ideas. So how did you make that transformation? Because that's it'shard right that you it's easy to go in and tell people what you want them todo and you this way you get what you want. How did you build a leaders, ateam of leadership and people accountable for something on their own?Well, you know, there's a lot of little things. You know. Wasn't all one thing,but part of it was just the concept of you can't hold somebody accountable ifyou think about the word. Holding and that's like supporting somebody andthen you think of accountable and accountable, is somebody standing ontheir own two feet. So if you try to hold somebody accountable, you're,really not letting them be accountable, and so, if you want accountable people,you give them what you know you talk about what you want to do you give themsome deadlines and you make sure they have all the help they need. I won'tsay, walk away, but you're not micromanaging them. You have kinic orsOke to all your processes and you're really focused on just really you kindof work as a supporting staff to them, instead of them working for you andit's just an that's why I was talking to you earlier about how everything islike a paradox was when I first started. I was you know my late ties and I wasthe big boss and I came in and I felt like a be the boss, and I found that myrole as a supporting person making sure they have all the tools they need. Theyunderstand the vision they understand what they need to do if they have theresources they need and the more that I worked for them, the more they wereable to accomplish and the happier everybody was more engaged. Everybodywas. Is that teachable or is that you have to recruit for that accountability,that a behavior that you look for when you're hiring someone? I really thinkit's a behavior that you just have to have that behavior and I know thatsometimes as business owners you're laying in bed at night and you'rethinking, if I could just get so and so to do their job, and you start havingthese conversations in your head about trying to get somebody to do their joband you start thinking well, if maybe I can pay him more money or maybe I canwrite them up or maybe I can try to...

...fire them or maybe I can you know- andyou have all these ideas of how you're going to force this person to do thejob that they know how to do right and if you think about it, you're thinkingabout blackmailing bribing threatening. All of this stuff to get somebody to dotheir job, but what I found is is that most accountable people are accountable.They don't have to do anything. You don't have to bribe em, they know to dotheir time. Well, you have to do what you said. You have to give them thetools you have to give them the vision and the resources and the clear goals,yeah and good training. Obviously this is for a trained employee. If they, ifthey're, not trained, you can't expect them to perform the way you want to go.So you talk about management, training right. So let me just talk a little bitabout. First talk a little bit about your company and then what I find mostfascinating is. You are not only wrote a book called the growth paradox. Theway to run a business is opposite of what you think. While I've known youyou went from being, Oh, I wrote it down. You didn't have a PhD. What doyou have a PHP? What was that PhD? What is that? Well, I had I told you, I hada PhD and I got that from my parents in my upbringing, it's being poor, hungryand driven a lot of the way I operate is from from being raised in thatenvironment, and it makes you very creative. I think growing up. Poor isactually an asset because it makes you scrappy. It makes you creative youlearn to get by with less it creates drive within you, and then I went on toget my NBA yeah right. That's no small feet and I didn't have my bachelor'sdegree either. So I know they let you in the NBA. I got my PhD first and Ifeel, like I learned to probably equally from both situations. Well,what you're doing is working right. Your bottom line is what this lasttrailing twelve months, as a percentage of your first o tells the high totalrevenue and net total revenue like just last month. We hit four point eightmillion last month, and so it was just a really knock out months, but we're inthe K, economy and the housing market is going up and so we're kind ofsailing right up at the housing market, and we expect there to be a little bitof an adjustment coming in the next year. We are that profit marginsomewhere around twenty five percent. So hopefully, if we hit our numbers,which were on track to hitting them, we should make bottom line around tenmillion dollars. Eight figures bottom, like Bravo, I love. I love watching.You grow over ten fifteen years, so you have really like you're the star. Youknow: How did you manage this growth like? What are the systems that as anentrepreneur you put in place to get to a machine? I think there's a lot ofdifferent things like, and I know I answer the question with telling youit's not one thing, but it really isn't one thing. So one of the things issomething that I learned from you o Staten and it was how to deal withfailure and you had a board a long time...

...ago in your office. That said somethingabout celebrate your mistakes and I thought that was really interesting. Istarted thinking about that and I started thinking about how, whenemploys fail a lot of times owners of companies don't look at it in the rightway and I started thinking about the whole idea of being a risk taker. Wejust being Richard. Branson just went up and he's a risk taker, and we seehim and Elon Musk as being very sexy because they take these big risks andthat super cool and super sexy to be a risk taker. But then, when we think ofthe word failure, that's not so sexy, nobody wants to be a failure right, butyou have to fail if your risk taker you're going to have to fail, becauseif you didn't fail, then it wouldn't be a risk right. There's got to be apotential of failure and I think sometimes, when it employes makemistakes or they fail. We tend to jump their ass sometimes and those failuresstart getting hiden under the rug, instead of being, as you said,celebrated and learned from so any time you are on and employes ass aboutmaking a mistake. You make it so that that failure is nota learnable experience, it's not about the person, it's the process, yeah andthen they start hiding these things and then the company can never grow and thecompany can never get better. So in the minding industry, a lot of things canhappen and we want to make sure that anything that goes wrong. We bring itup at a meeting and we look at it. We try to what I say is be OCD about it.We attach an owner of commitment and a dead line to it and we try to fix theprocess, and so that really helps with us just the idea of making a mistakeand how we deal with failure and mistakes. I like the way you recognizethe importance of meetings like you talked early about the meetings starton time. Without you, that's the most expensive thing. Any business is goingto do is meet right because her sure so talk about how you manage your meetingso you've got. You follow the the EOS process. I do and I have quite a fewdifferent meetings, but they all serve a very important purpose, so we have amorning huddle. Sometimes people call them stand up meetings. These were likewines here in Ovid. When we sent everybody home at the beginning of Ovid,we would do them with zoom and it was really a lifeline for our employees tojust get to talk to each other and what's interesting is we went fromemployees five or six years ago being very resistant to having huddlemeetings to employees getting there? Typically five minutes before thehuddle starts just because they want a chit chat and talk with their workfriends. So that was a really nice change to see. So we have our huddlemeeting. Then we have the weekly leadership meeting with all thedepartment heads and that meeting we go over Pindika ors, we processed issues,and you is that your ill ten meeting,...

...yes and then we have to do from that.That we assign people and then we push the US down, so we also havedepartmental El tens or you know once a week meeting. So I'm not sure whatyou'd call those and every single employee should have a lunch one withtheir manager once a week, and it could be a thirty minute or an hour one toone, because we think it's important for if you're a manager, there'snothing more important for you to do than spend time with people you manage,and so I have, I think, five or six one once with my employees each week andthey're setting stone and I meet them, and I really enjoy my one to one. So Iget to know my people better it. I have more of a personal relationship withthem as well and which I enjoy. It makes work fun for me. I love that alot. What do you look at in those meetings? You're right, MBA? You wentfrom you know, being the smartest one in the room and not realizing itbecause you'd say well. I don't really understand all these numbers to gettingyour MPA and right. So, like I'm fascinated to hear what you use in aservice business right because you know it's, people is the biggest expense sofor a service business, one of the important things, and- and this is whatI got from my dad- is you got to start by being on time and if you're not ontime things, you usually go downhill from there, because you show up and thefirst thing the customer. The first opinion they have is. I can't trust you.I can't trust you to keep your word, so we track on time scores. We track netperformance scores, which is a service score, but it's not an average. I thinkthey're called detractors and promoter attractors actually hit you harder thanthe promoters and really bring down that score. So we try the number of ourstart guys are getting to make sure they have enough money to support theirfamilies. We track the opportunities we receive, but I will have to say Stephenjust because you can track everything doesn't mean you should, and so whenpeople start realizing how exciting and wonderful key indicators are. Sometimesthey go a little bit crazy and they start tracking too much stuff and mostemployees unless you have an accounting firm. Most employees are not like you,Stephen, and they don't want to see all the dataand when everything's important, nothing's important. So with you throwtoo many numbers at your average employee they're, just like Whoa,that's just way too much, so you really want to focus on the most importantnumbers for that department or that individual yeah and less it'sabsolutely more. I could I strongly agree with you and I think the otherthing is. Do your numbers tie it all to your core values like do they do youtrack for sure? You talk about the relationship between, because a bigmistake I see all the time is people make score cards that country dictorquote to their value of team work right. They put teams against each other, thereporting when management monitors gets done. If you want a culture by Designn,you got T have reports that support...

...that. What do you track? What I wassaying before is one of our core values. Is We do what we say always and thatcomes from my dad? He was a very stand up guy and that's the on time score andthen that performance score is we arrive as strangers leave as friendswhere we want our customers by the time we leave. We want them to know thedriver's name and feel very comfortable with that driver, also just a goodexample of what you were saying about how you can pit teams against eachother. We created an online booking platform because we could see in themarket that our younger clients, they don't want to speak to humans. It's aninteresting story. I was talking to my son about it who encouraged me to dothis and I said no, but I don't want them seeing us out of a commodity andif I want to be able to explain the value of the move- and I don't want tobook moves that way and he said mom, it's not about what you want. It'sabout what your customers want. Fo, I completely owned in that moment, buthe's absolutely right and younger people. They don't want to speak toanybody, so we tried to create a very intint online process for booking moves.Well, our sales people saw that as competition because it took move out oftheir pipe line and it became just a very weird situation. We had to kind ofchange the way we stepped that up to where their teams and they worktogether. So the online booker actually supports their numbers, it's kind ofhard to explain to her on a phone call, but instead of them going against eachother, they actually we rolled their numbers to where they would encouragepeople that if they wanted to book online, they could actually help themthrough the process and still get credit for that booking. I love thatand you track all this in net sweet. Is that your platform yeah? We do, but wedo also have our phone system, which is five nine, which is supposed to beintegrated in that sweet, which that's another story. They say softwareintegrates, but you- and I know that doesn't always work exactly right, butwe have that and then we have some different apps we're doing a dashboardfor our drivers, so that they'll have an APP and they'll be able to see theirnumbers on their phone. Oh cool, yeah. I remember when you were building this.It was this you were deciding whether or not you take some of your profitsand invest in the future, and that of and what your concern was. You haveprofit sharing right and you're, trying to figure out how to not penalize yourfellow employees. If I remember the issue we processed so Kudos to you toput in your employees for us, I completely share that we ouid over along period of time, so it didn't hurt so bad steven yeah. Well it obviouslyyou got the rle on it because he opened up a hole new market. So what isculture at your organization? I mean you know we're not. Let me describethree men movies. First off you have colors, you have red and blue and white.In my right, yes, and- and I am not a cop- a guy but- and you see your trucksall over town- it's so proud to know you, because they're literally on KingWu drive every week. How did your dad...

...start a you? You know make? How does itaffect your success? Let me ask it that way. Okay, I think a lot of timespeople see culture as the colors or as the logo or as Ping Pong Games andpizza, and I think culture is a lot more than that. It's a more of it's amagnet, but in the sense of it, doesn't just attract people to your environmentwith all these perks and these wonderful things which we do have allthose things, but it also repels the people that you don't want to be onyour team and if you keep hiring and firing based on your culture, prettysoon you're going to have this very. What's the word Steven HomogeneousGroup of individuals that they all they're a lot of like andwhat ends up happening is the culture is so strong that that magnet repelsthe people that shouldn't be on the team. So one of our core values thatwas a principal my dad was we hustle. We were a card and that has always beena very driven part of our culture. Is We get to work and we put in a reallyhonest, hard days, work the guys out in the fields and then the people inoffice? Well, if we did somebody that has a less urgent attitude aboutgetting things done and they're more laid back and today doesn't mean today,it could be next week. It's not a manager that has to point that outtheir co workers immediately realize it's a wrong fit and usually theyrealize it's wrong fit and they don't fit and they end up having to leave.You know it kind of stinks for them, but you know they need to find a placewhere they fit the culture more and they're going to be happier anyway. SoI think a lot of times people just focus on the good, warm fuzzy part ofthe culture, but it also definitely should get rid of the people. You don'twant on your team, so that's easier said than done. I mean when I'mlistening to you, I'm hearing what an amazing a moving company that is selfregulating right. How did you get people to focus on that? I mean it'snot the money right I mean you have to pay a competitive wage. You have togive people safety in their life, but you know you're doing something morethan that. I think it comes from the top, at least at first. You can't saythat you have these values in this culture. If you have a top sales personthat doesn't practice your culture, but you don't want to fire them because youdon't want to lose the sales, because money is more important than theculture and as a executive and a person has to make those decisions every dayyou have to make decisions that sometimes hurt your short termpositavly, but will be helpful for you with a long term gain and you're,always making you're always trying to make that balance between. You knowyeah. This is going to hurt now, but hopefully in the future, it's going topay off yeah. You said it right there. The culture can't be the words on thewall in the conference room. It has to be the basis around which you make allyour decisions for sure. I love, though, that your mindset here is, you know,what's the value we deliver to our...

...plants? What's that happy experienceyou know so that if you create value, your employees will feel good all right,a talk about how you message that where does that come from what is it? Youknow was an employee at three men: movers, learn that what's your valueproposition and how you well, we we say with a couple of things like we haveobviously our value words, so we have a thing called a movies to and I'll kindof show it to you here, Stavin if you can sit yeah. So it's this this list ofpromises that we really read it out. Okay, so the first one is: We do whatwe say always and so, if, for some reason we can't honor what we do, we'renot afraid to lose money on it. So if we quoted a customer wrong price overthe phone and our sales, people made a mistake and we're giving over a hundredthousand quotes a year. So it does happen. Then we just we eat the costand we just make sure we honor what we said to our customer. The next one iswe hustle, meaning we're going to work hard, we're going to work with a senseof urgency. Then it's we go beyond so beyond. Just what you expect we'regoing to take the next step, the little s extra effort with each customer? Thenext point is we don't keep movers that you don't like. So if a mover continuessleek its bad in psoes and we can't get them trained up and where they shouldbe with customer service, we don't keep them. So we don't keep anybody, thecustomers and it's right now, it's hard to find good drivers out there. So ithurts our profitability. When we can't just throw, I mean we could throw abunch of guys on the trucks to increase our capacity, but we don't do that,we're very careful about who we put in people's homes. We arrive as strangersand leave his friends, that's about going into customers, house andengaging with them, and the idea that we're not just moving their furniture,we're not a logistics company where a Customer Service Company and we'removing humans, and it's all about the human interaction anybody can move aSofa but losing a family that takes a lot of skill where the experts we seekto be the best in the business, and we know that surprises are for birthdaysand not for move days and a means, an a over communicate with you and weactually get some feedback from customers like you've, told me thatfive times, but the opposite is a lot of these moving companies. They get outthere and they jack up the price or there's an hidden charge. We never wantto be that customer, but that that company, that tax on hidden charges andstuff like that. So that's what that's all about and the last one is your homeis sacred, and so, if you have certain rules for your house, we're going tohonor those. So what do you do with this? I mean. I know this is reallyimportant because it's you know, become your life blood, but how do you? Howdoes that core value work its way into every team like what are youidentifying behaviors that are successful here and report? So whenthere is an issue where something...

...happens wrong, we create a report andwe attach it to the movastar that it broke an email get sent, and you knowwe coach around the move. Festi, we have lots of training around the EFES,so this week actually is spirit week and I was like: Are we in high schoolor what spirit week and there's like crazy shirt week? I feel, likehomecoming dance, is going to happen at the end of the week or something I'mnot sure. If a but there's like some sort of contest that they're doingright now and it's you nominate somebody for each one of the Movastarthat they their qualities, that they have that comfits that live the FESTAand, what's really exciting, is when I started with the company. There was sixpeople there and now I'm getting emails about these great ideas and it's themost awesome thing when you grow your company, big enough to where you're,not the only person. Thinking of good ideas like there's lots of good ideas,Torto snowballs and gets set Ford Momentum, and that's super exciting forme- how many employees have you got now somewhere around fifty in the officeand then total your drivers? Your drivers have an interesting deal. Thisis talk a little bit about their partner drivers right there, yeah sothey're entrepreneurs and we help them and support them with back and support,so they own their own trucks. We do hope some of them finance her owntrumps. So we help him get in business a lot of times. We have like a not amentorship program, an apprenticeship program. That's it! We have an aprinter hip program where you can start off on somebody else's truck and driveit and then, as you start getting the reviews- and you share that you're ableto manage that troll and do really well, then we are willing to finance a truckfor you and put you in your own business a lot of times. People Frownupon that and they think, Oh, you know you're just subcontracting that out,but it's quite the opposite of what people think these guys have trucks.They have sometimes a couple hundred thousand invested in equipment andtrucks. It's not a fly by night. Thank for them, they're not going to go, finda job for an extra dollar somewhere else. They really care about thecustomer and care about the job and the work they do and they have a lot ofpride in oun those trucks and it shows- and your profit show right. You got bytaking care of your people by investing in their ability to create a betterlife and by creating an environment where people look forward to coming towork, to change the game so Kudos to you tell me about this book. So I lovethis idea, because I know how much I've learned from you in decade. The way torun a business is the opposite of what you think. What does that mean? I thinkit's more the way to scale a business as your business grows. It's theopposite of what you may be originally a thought when you first got in. I knowthat there is definitely a big leap from a company, that's about a three tomaybe maximum six million dollar company and then there's a huge jumpfrom that to the next level and a lot of people never make it to the nextlevel and that's when you really have...

...to start delegating and empoweringpeople around you and so as an owner. Instead of being like an answeringboots, where you're like in your office or you're on your cell phone and you're,your kind of shouting directions and saying yes or no, when people bringproblems to you, you turn more into a coach and venture and you push back andyou don't help them as much. You try to get them to figure things out on theirown to make decisions on their own, to empower them to really get theleadership skills. Not only will that increase the engagement in your company,it'll increase the happiness and your employees, but it also increases yourprofits and your work. Like balance, you really get to enjoy your off timebecause you've empowered people to be able to do things without you beingthere holding their hands. You know I've never heard it said that way by bymoving basically from the boss to that coach and mentor you're growing yourpeople, which grows your profits and your work. Life Balance We're havingthis conversation here about. You know people getting promoted into directorlevels and looking forward to actually having a better quality of life becausethey don't have to be the doer they get to actually delegate, but we have toteach them how to do that. Well, Jackie. I just love spending time with you.What did we miss in your great story of the Jackie noons path to profits? I think one of thethings I wanted to mention to you, you kind of hit upon it and I didn't gointo it was when you start growing your company. You have to have plannedgrowth and I think a lot of times you were so busy and when we're running astart up or small business you're, so busy trying to keep everything going,that you don't think about having planned growth and what I mean my pangrows is like looking at the future and saying: Okay Right now, I'm a fivemillion dollar company, and I want to be you and IV Goen in visage, wherepeople have their goals and they're like okay. In two years, I'm going tobe a twenty million dollar company, or something like that. But that's fine.Whatever your goals are but look at everybody in your company and figureout how many services or products you have to sell to get to that next levelthat you want to be where what year you're going to be at that level andthen look at your people and ask yourself: Can these people handle them?If you have five people in your sales department and you and your salesmanager can barely handle managing five people and in order to grow yourcompany in the next few years, you're going to have to add thirty people,okay, something's got to give or you got to fire your sales manager and getsomebody else, and I think in the past one of the mistakes Imade is on that way and that quest for success. I left a lot of dead bodies inthe wake of my path. You know and I'm like okay, we mean it was a mean youweren't afraid to fire people or what no not at all. But what it means isthat when they were not capaable of...

...doing their job, then I had to upgradeI kind of, and I hate to say it because Isound just like the biggest jerk, but I didn't know any other way. If thisperson was not able to do this job, then I had to find somebody that wascapable of doing this shop at the level that we had grown to. But now I knowwhere we're going to go, and so I look at my people and I'm like: Are theycapable of doing it? If the answer is no, I try to get the training if theyhave the right mentality and they're willing to learn. I try to grow thepeople along with the company and you don't think about that being an issue,but it actually becomes a very big issue. As you start growing is, if youdon't train your people, they're still going to be stuck with the skills tomanage a very small company when your company gets bigger, and so you do haveto fire and replace them or you have to bring them along with you, and thatmeans investing a lot of money in your people, and I, like my people, I wantto keep them and so like right now we have girth plans for everybody toincrease their skills and to grow right along with the company. Tell me moreabout that. I love that concept, so you have like personal development plansfor each person. Yes and it costs money, but it cost a lot of money, firingsomebody and hiring somebody and then hiring the wrong person. If you reallylike that employee and their hearts in it and they believe in the move ofFesta or whatever your values, are you want to keep them in order to keep onme, you really have to grow them. You have to invest in them, it's kind oflike you get, you know you get a car and then you try to drive it reallyreally fast and the engine wasn't built for that. Well, you're going to have toadd some opponents to the engine if you're going to take it out on to therace track, we're going super super fast and we got to get our people theeducation. They need to keep up with the company love that I mean. If, ifyou look at the cost of turnover versus the cost of training, training gets youlike a txanetkl is the biggest hidden cost in business. I'm with you on that.I think that's a great way to end this. Well, congratulations. You had bigshoes to fill. You know daddy's little girl, yeah. You really grew as a leaderand you know second generation businesses are rarely as successful asyours are. So I plug you, my friend. Thank you verymuch steven. I have pages of notes here. I love the fact that you started aspoor, hungry and driven. You got your PhD on the streets of Houston, Texasand that you're celebrating mistakes. I have gotten away from that. So I'mgoing to take that back to our company. You know, holding people accountable,you can't you got to. Let them be accountable, that's a great way oflooking at it and you know if you give them the tools and the vision and theresources and then clear Gulf measuring they have results naturally makes ithappen, and you know meetings Os traction. I love a shout out fortraction because that's the most expensive thing you do got keepsattraction happening, but I think the big take away from me was how culturehas had such a significant impact in...

...your business and it's not what wenormally think. You know we have a ping pong table. We have a foosball table,we have colors, but it's that's not it. It's the starting at the top everybodyknowing it and making sure that you're making hard decisions. If that sells,person doesn't fit the culture even outer the biggest bread winter, theygot to go it's time it's hard, but it's the men move, a festo is pretty cool. Ilike arrive as strangers and leave as friends, because my daughter works atstarbucks and they teach you to learn the customers name their favorite order.The whole thing is the world is changed on its service side so and then finallygrowing those people, you know if you grow those people, you grow yourprofits and you'll and investing with their future growth, because ifsomebody fits the culture, you can't let them go. Thank you. I miss you investage. I think you should come back Jack. If anybody wants to reach you orfree men movers, how do they find you well if they want to reach stream andMavers, they can go to our website through memoes. If they want to reachme, my website should be lived by the time this podcast is broadcast and it'sJackie Fisher Fischer and Jack J C K Y com, or they can just reach out to mein Linton and if you're, a publisher, Jackie's book growth. Paradox islooking for one right, yes, Cano. If you know a publisher, you want toPublish her book right. Jackie Fisher thinks I love you so much good to seeyou and thank you for taking the time to join us on path the profits and tothe rest of you will see you next time visit growth, forcot for more healthfulresources to help you find your own path to profit growth force is a smartback office solution that CEOS need for better financial management of theirbusiness, delivering the level of reliability, consistency and expertisethat is typically reserved for mid market companies fromadvancedbookkeeping management, accounting control and advisoryservices. Growth Force provides dedicated teams and cloud basedtechnology that becomes a scale to solution or a meet. You where you areto learn more visit. Growth for stock you've been listening to a the profitto ensure that you never miss an episode subscribe to the show in yourfavorite podcast player, if you're listening a podcast, we'd love for youto give a quick grating show just have the number of stars Oinos deserves.Thank you so much for listening until next time. I.

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